New Hampshire In Fall

I recently had the opportunity to visit my work buddy in New Hampshire.  The trip was kind of thrown together in spite of all sensible reasons against it, and another couple from San Diego even met us there.  If you knew all of us, you would find the story funny, but you don’t so I’ll spare you the details.

We arrived at Boston Logan late.  Here’s the view from my friend’s street early the next morning.

Chasing the fall foliage in New England was a more involved process than I was expecting.  There is, apparently, a very small window of opportunity for us “Leaf Peepers” to see the “peak” colors.  And the peak moves across the area, not returning until the following year.  We were supposed to be in the Derry, New Hampshire area at the correct time for that location, but my friend explained to me that the dry summer meant that the peak window was even tighter this year.

Our first big activity was taking The Cog railway to the top of Mt. Washington.  As we were leaving the Bretton Woods area, we stopped by the side of the road to go check out a part of the Ammonoosuc River.

The next day we headed to Portsmouth.  But before we got there, we stopped to see one of the official covered bridges in New Hampshire.

We then went to Portsmouth, New Hampshire.  This was our only gray, rainy day, but it felt perfect for the area.  Below is the Memorial Bridge between Portsmouth and Kittery, Maine.  That’s my work buddy, by the way.  He was feeling sad and lonely at the time and was listening to Lionel Richie when I took this image.

The next day was sunny, and we spent it in Boston.  Although that was a great day too, I think I prefer the smaller towns and scenery experienced in New Hampshire.  I think, at this point, I can finally remember that my friend doesn’t live in Vermont.

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